This week is poison prevention week, which is recognized every year in the third week of March. Created in 1961 by an act of Congress, it is intended as “a means for local communities to raise awareness of the dangers of unintentional poisonings and to take such preventive measures as the dangers warrant.”(PoisonPrevention.org)Ann Arbor Animal Hospital: Easter Lily (poisonous to cats)

Even though the intention of Poison Prevention Week is primarily to raise awareness about and prevent poisoning in children, we think it’s a perfect time to remind about the dangers of poisoning to our beloved companion animals as well. Consider that, though the winter is now nearly over and rodents may be moving back outdoors, the dangers posed by rodenticides remain as long as the poison is still out; even if your pet doesn’t eat the poison directly, it could eat a sick or dead rodent which had ingested the poison.

Of course, poisoning isn’t only caused by things designated as poison. For example, while most people know that chocolate is poisonous to dogs, the dangers that the sugar-substitute xylitol poses are less well-known, though potentially more severe. And did you know that all parts of the Easter lily— even the pollen– can cause toxicosis if eaten by cats?

Here at the Ann Arbor Animal Hospital, we strive to keep our clients informed of potential dangers to their pets, and as always, we stress prevention as the best source of medicine. Even so, not everything is preventable and accidents do happen. Below are links for the Pet Poison Helpline and Animal Poison Control. Consider bookmarking them and/or writing down or storing the phone numbers. In an emergency, time is of the essence.

And remember, we are always here, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

 

ASPCA Animal Poison Control(888) 426-4435 – A $65 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

Pet Poison Helpline(855) 764-7661 – $59 per incident fee applies.